FacebookInstagramTwitterContact

 

2023 BIMP-EAGA SPM Dirasmikan           >>           Penandatanganan MoU Penaiktarafan BGEC           >>           Pelancaran Pusat Kecemerlangan Sejarah, Kesultanan Brunei Psb           >>           'I Had To Breastfeed My Husband On Holiday – It Was The Weirdest Thing We've Done'           >>           Librarians Left In Stitches As Overdue Book Finally Returned After 43 Years           >>           Khloe Kardashian Sets The Record Straight On Her Current Relationship Status           >>           Eminem's Daughter Hailie Jade Is Engaged To Evan Mcclintock           >>           See Chris Brown's Shocking Reaction To Losing 2023 Grammy For Best R&B Album           >>           Nissan Warns Costs Must Fall To Make New Electric Cars In UK           >>           Tech Lay-Offs: Dell To Cut Workforce           >>          

 

SHARE THIS ARTICLE




REACH US


GENERAL INQUIRY

[email protected]

 

ADVERTISING

[email protected]

 

PRESS RELEASE

[email protected]

 

HOTLINE

+673 222-0178 [Office Hour]

+673 223-6740 [Fax]

 



Upcoming Events





Prayer Times


The prayer times for Brunei-Muara and Temburong districts. For Tutong add 1 minute and for Belait add 3 minutes.


Imsak

: 05:07 AM

Subuh

: 05:17 AM

Syuruk

: 06:36 AM

Doha

: 06:59 AM

Zohor

: 12:35 PM

Asar

: 03:56 PM

Maghrib

: 06:32 PM

Isyak

: 07:44 PM

 



The Business Directory


 

 



Internet & Media


  Home > Internet & Media


Facebook Is Trying To Bring Its Basic Internet Services To The US


 


 October 7th, 2016  |  08:49 AM  |   1157 views

ENGADGET

 

 

The company wants to get the government on its side before it launches.

 

 

Facebook initially launched "Free Basics" as a way to bring basic internet services to countries with limited or no traditional internet connectivity, but now it sounds like the company is working with the White House to bring the program to the US for the first time. According to the Washington Post, Facebook is actively exploring how it can bring Free Basics to "low income and rural Americans" who can't afford broadband internet either at home or through a smartphone. But the catch will be doing so without attracting the regulatory attention that got Free Basics banned in India earlier this year.

 

Essentially, Free Basics is a zero-rating scheme, not entirely dissimilar to what T-Mobile has been pulling by offering select music and video services that don't hit your data cap (with compromises, of course). Verizon similarly offers its Go90 video service to customers without its content counting against bandwidth caps.

 

The Free Basics platform offers things like local news, weather, Wikipedia and Facebook access over your phone, and those sites that fall under its umbrella can be accessed without incurring a data charge. But zero-rating plans like Free Basics have come under intense scrutiny as they are in strong conflict with net neutrality rules -- indeed, India cracked down on all zero-rating schemes, not just Free Basics. The concern is smaller companies won't be able to offer things that giants like Facebook can, putting them at a pretty distinct disadvantage. And it obviously gives users lots of incentive to use Facebook, if it won't be counting against your data cap.

 

So Facebook is trying to head off these regulatory problems in the US before it launches, rather than afterwards. The company is trying to convince smaller, rural internet and cellular providers to join up with it and waive any data charges that users of Free Basics incur. Simultaneously, Facebook is also trying to court the government and get it on board with its plan.

 

What could be a saving grace for Facebook is the fact that the company is now letting any third-party organization or service participate in Free Basics; previously, Facebook was the decider of what Free Basics users could access. Still, zero-rating schemes and net neutrality in general have been under scrutiny by the FCC, though the regulator hasn't taken any action against Verizon and T-Mobile's schemes just yet. But if Facebook can get the FCC on its side before it brings Free Basics to the US, it will have cleared one of the biggest hurdles in its way.

 


 

Source:
courtesy of ENGADGET

by Nathan Ingraham

 

If you have any stories or news that you would like to share with the global online community, please feel free to share it with us by contacting us directly at [email protected]

 

Related News


Deputy Minister: Moh In Final Phase Of Preparing Health White Paper

 2023-02-07 09:43:27

Second Balloon Over Latin America Is Ours – China

 2023-02-07 11:27:53

Nissan Warns Costs Must Fall To Make New Electric Cars In UK

 2023-02-07 12:10:04