FacebookInstagramTwitterContact

 

2023 BIMP-EAGA SPM Dirasmikan           >>           Penandatanganan MoU Penaiktarafan BGEC           >>           Pelancaran Pusat Kecemerlangan Sejarah, Kesultanan Brunei Psb           >>           'I Had To Breastfeed My Husband On Holiday – It Was The Weirdest Thing We've Done'           >>           Librarians Left In Stitches As Overdue Book Finally Returned After 43 Years           >>           Khloe Kardashian Sets The Record Straight On Her Current Relationship Status           >>           Eminem's Daughter Hailie Jade Is Engaged To Evan Mcclintock           >>           See Chris Brown's Shocking Reaction To Losing 2023 Grammy For Best R&B Album           >>           Nissan Warns Costs Must Fall To Make New Electric Cars In UK           >>           Tech Lay-Offs: Dell To Cut Workforce           >>          

 

SHARE THIS ARTICLE




REACH US


GENERAL INQUIRY

[email protected]

 

ADVERTISING

[email protected]

 

PRESS RELEASE

[email protected]

 

HOTLINE

+673 222-0178 [Office Hour]

+673 223-6740 [Fax]

 



Upcoming Events





Prayer Times


The prayer times for Brunei-Muara and Temburong districts. For Tutong add 1 minute and for Belait add 3 minutes.


Imsak

: 05:07 AM

Subuh

: 05:17 AM

Syuruk

: 06:36 AM

Doha

: 06:59 AM

Zohor

: 12:35 PM

Asar

: 03:56 PM

Maghrib

: 06:32 PM

Isyak

: 07:44 PM

 



The Business Directory


 

 



Internet & Media


  Home > Internet & Media


Facebook Aflame Over Laundry Detergent Ad In Which Woman Turns Black Man Pale


Yes, she's putting detergent into her man's mouth.

 


 May 27th, 2016  |  10:17 AM  |   1983 views

CNET

 

Technically Incorrect: In China, Qiaobi laundry detergent launches an ad that many find racist.

Last December, the poster for "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" in China was criticized because John Boyega -- the actor who played Finn -- was scarcely visible.

 

Boyega is black. Some thought the poster racist.

 

Now comes an ad for Qiaobi, a Chinese laundry detergent that has already incited many online to describe it as openly racist.

 

The ad shows a woman doing her laundry. Her presumed boyfriend, who is black, wanders over to her.

 

You think they might kiss. Instead, she shoves the finest Qiaobi detergent into his mouth, forces him into the washing machine and turns it on.

 

She then sits on the machine, ignoring the man's cries.

When the cycle is over, you'll never guess what emerges. Why, yes. The black man is now Chinese.

 

Even the wiliest of diplomats would surely struggle to chuckle this one away.

 

Indeed, when the Shanghaiist posted it to Facebook it not only garnered hundreds of thousands of views, but also comments such as this from Claudio Marcius Melfi: "Wow. That is really the most racist ad I have ever seen. Would certainly cause civil and criminal law suits if aired in other countries."

 

It would cause slightly more than that, I fear.

 

Then there was this from Angel Negron: "This is great. I remember a few weeks ago Chinese people going off on how they aren't racist and American's are racist. This most definitely puts that argument to rest."

 

Some, though, thought it, oh yes, amusing.

 

"It's just a commercial about a product that changes the color of your clothes, there's a version that goes from white guy to a black guy," wrote Xiao Hua. "nobody complained, but omg from black to yellow?? how dare you! You must be racist now! People on the Internet are just too sensitive for no reason, use your brain and laugh a bit."

 

He was, I fear, referring to an Italian ad from 2007 that did indeed depict a white man being washed into becoming a black man, because "colored is better." Oddly, this ad had almost identical music to the new Chinese one and several other remarkable similarities. (Video below.)

 

On YouTube, too, the Chinese ad quickly came before hundreds of thousands of eyes, with one poster accusing it of "raw racism." But again, one reply offered: "Respect to China for not giving a damn about political correctness."

 

 

It's unclear how much this ad has been seen in China. As BuzzFeed reports, on China's biggest online retail store Taobao, a mere 44 boxes had been sold.

 

Attempts to contact Qiaobi were unsuccessful. The ad, though, has perhaps already become a success of sorts by making the brand famous.

 

Sometimes, though, it's worth wondering what you should be famous for.

 


 

Source:
courtesy of CNET

by Chris Matyszczyk

 

If you have any stories or news that you would like to share with the global online community, please feel free to share it with us by contacting us directly at [email protected]

 

Related News


Deputy Minister: Moh In Final Phase Of Preparing Health White Paper

 2023-02-07 09:43:27

Second Balloon Over Latin America Is Ours – China

 2023-02-07 11:27:53

Nissan Warns Costs Must Fall To Make New Electric Cars In UK

 2023-02-07 12:10:04